An invitro study on the regulation of oxidative protective genes in human gingival and intestinal epithelial cells after treatment with salmon protein hydrolysate peptides

Bomi Framroze, Freddy Havaldar, Shashi Misal

Abstract


Background: Under physiological conditions, molecular oxygen generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) as metabolic by-products. In the absence of an adequate defense mechanism, the accumulation of ROS leads to cell membrane and DNA damage, in addition to tissue degeneration. The up/down regulation of one or more oxidative stress-related genes is one mechanism which confers cytoprotection to tissues exposed to oxidative injury.

Methods: We measured up/down regulation of 84 oxidative protective genes in primary human gingival epithelial pooled cells and human intestinal epithelial cells after pretreatment with 25, 50, and 100 μM/ml of salmon protein hydrolysate solution. A human RT2 Profiler PCR array was used to evaluate the relative change in the expression of these common oxidative protective genes. The salmon protein hydrolysate contains a mixture of bioactive peptides, resulting from enzyme hydrolysis of salmon head and backbones.

Results: Treatment with salmon protein hydrolysate peptides demonstrated up-regulation for 16 human oxidative protective genes and down-regulation for 9 human oxidative stress-related genes. Three genes (ferritin heavy polypeptide-1 (FTH1), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), and arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (ALOX12)) showed regulation changes at physiologically applicable levels.

Conclusions The improved oxidation protection observed after SPH treatment conferred by HMOX1 / ALOX12 regulation to HGEPp and HIEC-6 cells may find ultimate utility for these bioactive peptides in the modulation of gastrointestinal stress in irritable bowel syndrome and enterocolitis.

Full Text: [Abstract] [Full Article]

DOI: 10.31989/ffhd.v8i8.529

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.
x
Message